Brayden Whitlock

Edmonton - Wetaskiwin

 

Political

 

Menu:



General



Federal Campaign 2015

Introduction


          I consider my political philosophy an extension of my moral philosophy.  If there were no moral disagreements, then politics would simply be a matter of administrative logistics.  Thus I often let moral ideals permeate my political agenda and conflicts can often arise between pragmatism in the immediate sense and morality.  I tend to use the term "long-term libertarian' to describe myself, when pressed for a brief summary. I think it is the best balance between pragmatic realism and what is morally right. Therefore, a great deal of my federal political involvement is through the Libertarian Party of Canada.  I was a member of this party  for two years as it was the best fit, though not a perfect one.  I tend to interpret my platform in a long-term sense, and I encourage you to do the same. After my time with the Libertarian Party, I moved to the Conservative Party of Canada to try to better combine morality and pragmatism.  


          I was a candidate in the 2015 federal election, during my time with the LoC.  I did this knowing that being elected from a small party was approximately impossible; it was a long-term statement and a learning exercise, and I consider the project a success. My team managed to secure about 1% of the vote. I am pleased to see that kind of growth. I was also delighted to partake in public forums where I had a chance to help people realize that politics doesn't have to be reliant on tradition and immune to technological and philosophical advancement.


          Despite my acknowledgement of the unlikelihood of election from a a small organization, I do really believe that some election victory for the Libertarian Party of Canada would be good for the country, as people seem to overlook a little less government as an option. With the impressive growth seen over the past decade, I look forward to seeing libertarian representatives in parliament soon to lend some balance to the fairly homogeneous Canadian political voices.


-BW